Skinny Citrus Pudding

20170216_134210We still have a few more weeks of winter before we officially hit spring despite many places across the country experiencing milder temperatures than usual. For many across the nation, winter is a time when it is harder to find fresh, in season produce to utilize. Citrus is currently one of the select finds currently in season across the nation and in abundance this time of year. If you find yourself with a lot of citrus and want to experiment with something new than this recipe is just for you.

20170216_133233Some of you may look at this and be confused thinking it is more like a citrus curd and not a pudding, but I assure you it is indeed a pudding. This pudding uses cornstarch as a thickener and a curd does not use cornstarch. If you begin eating this with the mindset of a traditional pudding you will probably be a little shocked. It is tart so be warned. Don’t be tempted to add more sugar. If you want it to be a little tamer than I suggest cutting back on the orange zest by ¼ tsp. If you are looking for a different type of light dessert that is inexpensive and easy to prepare than give this recipe a go. It surely will not disappoint!

20170216_133225Skinny Citrus Pudding

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp. Sugar
  • 1 tsp. Grated Orange Zest
  • 1 cup Fresh Orange Juice
  • 1 cup Tangerine Juice
  • 3 tbsp. Cornstarch
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • 1 tbsp. Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 tsp. Unsalted Butter
  • ¼ cup Heavy Whipping Cream; divided
  • Mint; optional

Preparation:

  1. Combine the sugar and orange zest in a small saucepan; crush with spatula or a wooden spoon to excrete oils of zest into sugar (sugar will turn yellowish-orange in color).
  2. Stir in the tangerine juice, orange juice, cornstarch, and salt. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Boil 2 minutes or until thickened, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; stir in lemon juice and butter. Pour the pudding into a bowl; cover surface of pudding with plastic wrap and chill.
  3. Place cream in bowl and beat with a mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form. Fold half of the cream into the pudding.
  4. To serve: Spoon ½ cup pudding into dessert bowls or glasses. Top each serving with 1 tbsp. of whipped cream and a sprig of mint (if desired).

 

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

(½ cup pudding & 1 tbsp. cream)

 

citruspuddingnutritionlabel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight Watchers: 9 Smart Points, 5 Points Plus, or 4 Traditional Points

 

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM: DEBORAH MADISON
PHOTOGRAPHY & STAGING: PETER MENDOROS

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEES PATISSERIE 2017

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Clementine Cake

20170113_210838I love to bake with what is currently in season. While the majority of the country’s home-grown produce is out of season, Floridians know that citrus is currently at its peak. I recently realized I have never produced a citrus-based confection this time of year and decided this needed to change. Perhaps the reason I always avoided citrus despite the abundant availability around me is my hidden fear of a bitter final product. In order to get that strong citrus flavor you need the oils from the zest, which requires that the entire fruit be processed, peel and all.

Growing up I always hated the bitter taste of even the slightest bit of pith on my orange or mandarin segments and would spend way too much time working to remove every last bit of “white stuff” so that I could actually enjoy the segment. Very early on I grew annoyed with any citrus that had a peel and came to enjoy the canned mandarin oranges as my substitute. Now, as an adult, I realize the fresh stuff is way better than anything from a can but I still struggle shaking away those childhood bad habits regarding piths.

20170112_134033Since I have yet to successfully overcome my childhood habit I needed to find a recipe that would suit my avoidance of using the entire fruit to provide citrus flavor. If you do a recipe search for mandarin flavored cakes you will quickly realize there are typically only 2 formulas used. The most common formula uses canned mandarin oranges and a cake mix. Although this may do in a hurry it is not what I was looking for since I am seeking to avoid processed foods. The second formula uses the entire mandarin and purees it in a food processor. Neither of these fit my needs so I had to come up with my own solution.

The first step to solving any problem is knowing what the desired outcome is and what is preventing you from getting there. My desired outcome was a cake with a citrus punch without using the entire fruit, however the problem is without the entire fruit the cake lacks bulk and intense citrus flavor. To solve this I created a compromise. I would use zest from the clementines, and use segments of the clementines but discard the remaining peels. In order to sub for the missing bulk the peels would have provided the batter I added a raisin paste along with the segments and walnuts. The raisin paste not only added bulk to the batter but it also acted as a natural sweetener, allowing me to cut down on some of the sugar therefore making the recipe a bit healthier. To give a bit more sweetness and citrus flavor I topped the cooled cake with a Tangerine juice glaze. If you are wondering how to make raisin paste, you simply place some raisins into your food processor and add water just enough to cover the top of the raisins. Simply puree the mixture and voila you have raisin paste. If you make too much you can always store it in the refrigerator for future uses. It is a great sub for whole dates in many recipes.

20170111_163929All in all I was very pleased with the outcome of this cake. It was moist, not overly sweet, and had a nice touch of citrus flavor without any lingering bitterness. In our sugar filled world this cake may not please the masses like its frosted cousins but it is sure to please those who enjoy tasting actual cake and not a touch of cake covered in ten pounds of sugary frosting. Give it a try and enjoy the produce of the season…citrus!

Clementine Cake

Ingredients:

  • Cooking Spray
  • ½ cup Walnut Halves; toasted
  • 4 tbsp. Raisin Paste (see description above for details)
  • 1 tbsp. Clementine Zest
  • 2 Clementines; peeled & segmented
  • ½ cup Light Brown Sugar
  • 3 tbsp. Unsalted Butter; softened
  • 2 tbsp. Olive Oil
  • ¾ tsp. Vanilla Extract
  • 1 Large Egg
  • 9 oz. All-Purpose Flour (2 cups); plus more for dusting pan
  • ¾ tsp. Baking Soda
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • ½ cup Fat-Free Buttermilk
  • 1 cup Powdered Sugar
  • 5 tsp. Fresh Tangerine Juice
  • Toasted Walnut Halves; for topping

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Coat a 9-inch round cake pan with cooking spray. Line the bottom of the pan with parchment paper. Coat the parchment with cooking spray and dust with flour. Set aside.
  2. Place walnuts, raisin paste, zest, and clementine segments in a food processor and process until ground.
  3. Combine brown sugar, butter, and oil in the bowl of a stand mixer (or large bowl). Beat mixture with a stand or hand mixer set to medium speed until well blended. Beat in vanilla and egg.
  4. Combine the flour, baking soda, and salt. Add the flour mixture and buttermilk to the sugar mixture, alternating between the two, beginning and ending with the flour mixture. Add the nut mixture and beat at medium speed for 3 minutes. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean. Cool cake in pan 10 minutes on a wire rack. After 10 minutes remove the cake from the pan and cool completely on a wire rack.
  5. After the cake has cooled completely, in a small bowl combine the powdered sugar and Tangerine juice. Whisk until smooth. Drizzle the glaze over the warm cake and spread to coat the top evenly. Top the outer edge of the cake with toasted walnuts. Serve.

 

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM: DEBORAH MADISON
PHOTOGRAPHY & STAGING: PETER MENDOROS

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEES PATISSERIE 2017

Glazed Orange-Pecan Bread

3This winter came a bit late for us like many others in the U.S. and with that wait for the arrival of colder temps came a delay in many of my favorite winter recipes. I usually have made some type of soup or chili by November, yet this year my first soup did not come until late December, practically January. The same goes for bread. There is nothing that spells winter like a fresh, warm loaf of bread from the oven. I tend to associate the two because I dislike going out in the cold and so I would traditionally bake to occupy myself plus keep the house warm. This is my first bread of the season and I have to say it was a spectacular choice.

2The inspiration to make an orange infused bread came from the constant reminder of fresh oranges currently in season here. Every day upon leaving home, I see all of the orange trees in the grove across the street from our subdivision. Recently, all of the oranges have ripened and the sweet smell of blossoms are just starting to permeate the air signifying their arrival. This bread is the perfect representation of what oranges have to offer. Infused with a triple punch of orange flavor, the bread is not only full of citrus but is also quick and easy to make. You do not need a mixer, only a spoon and two bowls. Simple and quick so that you can be devouring this delicious and lighter bread.

1

Glazed Orange-Pecan Bread

Bread Ingredients:

  • Cooking Spray
  • 1 ¾ cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 tsp. Baking Powder
  • ½ tsp. Baking Soda
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • ¼ tsp. Ground Nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp. Ground Allspice
  • ½ cup Sugar
  • ½ cup Low-Fat Buttermilk
  • ¼ cup Chopped Pecans; toasted
  • 3 tbsp. 1% Low-Fat Milk
  • 3 tbsp. Olive Oil
  • 3 tbsp. Orange Marmalade
  • 1 tsp. Orange Extract
  • 2 Eggs

Glaze Ingredients:

  • ½ cup Powdered Sugar
  • 2 tsp. Orange Juice; fresh squeezed
  • 2 tsp. Chopped Pecans; toasted

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°. Spray a 9 x 5 inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Set aside.
  2. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, nutmeg, and allspice together in a large bowl. Stir together with a whisk, making a well in the center of the mixture. Set aside.
  3. In another large bowl, combine sugar, buttermilk, pecans, milk, oil, marmalade, extract, and eggs. Whisk until thoroughly blended. Pour mixture into the well made in the flour mixture. Stir mixtures together until just moistened.
  4. Spoon batter into prepared loaf pan. Bake in preheated oven for approximately 45 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out with a few crumbs attached (or clean). Cool bread for 10 minutes in the pan on a wire rack. After 10 minutes, remove the bread from the loaf pan and cool completely on the wire rack.
  5. After the bread has cooled prepare the glaze. Combine the powdered sugar and juice together until mixture is smooth. Drizzle the glaze over the cooled bread and sprinkle with the chopped pecans. Serve.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

(1 Slice)

glazed orange pecan bread label

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight Watchers: 7 Smart Points, 5 Points Plus, or 4 Traditional Points

 

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM: MAUREEN CALLAHAN
PHOTOGRAPHY & STAGING: PETER MENDOROS

 

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEES PATISSERIE 2016

Pumpkin Spice Cupcakes

Happy Tuesday everyone. Sorry for the momentary disappearance from my blogging recently but I have just acquired a new job and have been dedicated to learning my training. Let me tell you it took too much out of me and whenever I would come home it was way too much to even think about looking at a computer screen, let alone writing all night. So on my day off, my gift to you is a post on Pumpkin Spice cupcakes. My mood was feeling simplistic and this is the result. It probably would have been better to post this around Halloween or Thanksgiving perhaps…well at least the fall season, but of course me the procrastinator waited until almost Spring! Oh well, as the saying goes better late then never.

 So to start these simple Pumpkin inspired cupcakes, you can do one of two things based upon your skill level or your alotted time needed. You can either make the cupcake batter from scratch or you can buy a boxed spice cake mix and build on it from there. I suggest for the best results to make the batter from scratch but as always sometimes we have short notices and we all have lives and it is often hard to spare enough time for kitchen matters. Completely understandable. Regardless they will turn out delicious, impressive, and best of all… simple. If you choose to make the spice cake batter from scratch you will need a handful of spices on hand. For the most important spice, Cinnamon, I chose to use a certain variety for in this formula.

Although it is not required that you use China Cassia or Ceylon Cinnamon as I did, I do recommend using either as it does add an exoticism to the flavor of the cupcake. Some of the other spices you will need is Allspice, Nutmeg, Ginger, Mace, and Cloves. This combination of spices provides a perfect compliment to the Pumpkin and gives rich flavor to the cupcakes without overpowering the pumpkin flavor, only enhancing. Keeping in mind not to overpower the pumpkin or spice flavoring of the cake itself, I chose a Simple Buttercream formula for the frosting, flavored only with a hint of vanilla as not to detract from the cake but rather enhance it with a smooth creaminess up top. With the theme of pumpkin in mind, the frosting is tinted orange. For this I used Wilton’s Orange dye to achieve a light pastel orange that remains soft and elegant on the eye. You don’t want it to be the actual color of the pumpkin which is much darker and brighter as it will take away from the sheer elegance and look more like a store bought kid’s party cupcake, which is fine for your child’s birthday but for this particular formula we want adult, classy cupcakes here 🙂 One the pastel orange color is mixed, grab your decorator’s bag and a star tip (I used #843). You can choose to decorate the tops in any way that you wish however. I have provided you two simple examples. The first and perhaps easiest is simply piping the typical swirl topping around the entire surface of the cupcake. I did two sweeps around to give height to the cupcake then topped it with some prepared nut topping anyone can find in your local supermarket near the packaged nuts of your baking aisle or near the ice cream toppings. The other option is to use a small star tip and gently press down and lift to create mini stars across the entire surface of the cupcake. These look fancy but are extremely simple to create. I suggest you do some of both to add contrast to your presentation. Now for those who do not like pumpkin, you can also leave out the pumpkin puree and solely have a spice cake. Both are delicious!!!

Pumpkin Spice Cupcakes

*Cake*

Ingredients:

  • 1 box Spice Cake Mix or the following…
  • 2 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 tsp. Baking Soda
  • 1 tsp. Baking Powder
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. Ginger
  • ¼ tsp. Allspice
  • ¼ tsp. Nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp. Cloves
  • 1/8 tsp. Mace
  • 1 cup Light Brown Sugar
  • 1 cup Granulated Sugar
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) Unsalted Butter, softened/room temperature
  • 4 Eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 (15 oz.) can Pumpkin Puree

Formula:

  1. Adjust oven rack to the middle position and preheat to 350°. Line two 12-count cupcake pans with paper liners. Grease lightly with cooking spray. In a bowl, either prepare the spice cake mix according to package directions, stopping before proceeding to the step asking you to fill the cupcake tin with batter…or sift the flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, ginger, allspice, nutmeg, cloves, and mace together. 
  2. In another bowl, mix together the sugars, butter, and eggs. Slowly add the dry ingredients and mix until combined. If using the homemade version or the box mix, be sure to add the pumpkin puree now. If making a spice cake without pumpkin, proceed to step 3. Whisk in the pumpkin puree until combined and smooth.
  3. Divide the batter evenly among the cupcake liners, filling each no more than halfway. Bake for about 20 to 25 minutes, being sure to rotate the pans halfway through the baking time. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Prepare the buttercream frosting.

*Buttercream Frosting*

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup Vegetable Shortening
  • ½ cup (1 stick) Butter, softened
  • 1 tsp. Vanilla Extract
  • 4 cups Confectioner’s Sugar, sifted
  • 2 tbsp. Milk

Formula:

  1. In a bowl, cream the shortening and butter together until smooth. Add vanilla. Gradually add the sifted Confectioners’ sugar until all sugar is added and combined. The mixture will appear dry. Add milk and whisk well until smooth and creamy. Add a few drops of orange food color until desired pastel color is achieved.
  2. Fill a piping bag fitted with a large or small star tip. Pipe along the top of the cooled pumpkin spice cupcakes in a circular motion, building up a round height or gently press down and gently pull up and away creating mini stars all across the surface. If not piping the mini stars, sprinkle some nut topping or your favorite chopped nuts on top. Serve.

Special Thanks To:

Peter Mendoros – Photography


All content © Honeybee’s Patisserie 2012

Brown-Eyed Susan Cake

Happy Holidays everyone. I hope you all had a wonderful Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanza, etc., and I wish you all a Happy New Year from Honeybee’s Patisserie. Let me tell you, it was a busy Christmas for me, but I still managed to crank out a few sweets and capture some photos for the blog. This particular sweet on topic for today is the Brown-Eyed Susan Cake. I particularly like this cake, not only for its wonderful flavor combinations of orange and chocolate, but because of the flower it represents. As a child, I used to go picking the brown centered, yellow petal flowers with my grandfather, although it was illegal in the location we were picking them. I still remember him telling me as I held bunches of brown-eyes susans in my little hands, to watch for any cars with bright, flashy lights coming our way and to notify him immediately if there were. It makes me smile to this day knowing I was doing misdemeanor activity at the age of seven and that the flowers my relatives received were always attained via trespassing on private property.

 Thankfully, achieving this cake doesn’t require illegal activity, therefore I shall share it with all of you. First, start off with your favorite formula for a basic yellow cake batter. Once you prepare the yellow cake batter, you divide it equally between two bowls. One bowl will be your chocolate batter, one will be your orange which you will marble into your cake pans. Once the cake layers are baking, choose your favorite type of frosting formula. I chose a simple buttercream because during the holidays I desired something…well simple. As with the yellow cake batter, be sure to separate your frosting into two separate bowls, one for orange flavor and one for chocolate. All in all the cake is rather effortless to prepare. The layering and decorating is likely the most troublesome for the average home baker. Good news is, the way you decorate it depends on your personal preference so no rules. I started with chocolate rosettes on top, a chocolate chip border for the crown, and a shell border along the bottom. However, you could easily take some candied orange peels to resemble petals and place them around a chocolate chip center to resemble the wildflower itself. Place multiple replica flowers on the top of the cake and it would look superb with less piping fuss!

Brown-Eyed Susan Cake

Ingredients:

  • 1 formula Yellow Cake Batter, enough for two 9 in. cake pans
  • 5 oz. Unsweetened Chocolate, melted
  • 1 tsp. Orange Extract
  • 1 tbsp. Orange Juice
  • 4 cups Vanilla Frosting, preferably Buttercream
  • Yellow Food Color
  • Semisweet Chocolate Chips, optional
  • Candied Orange Peel, optional

Formula:

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position. Preheat oven to 350°. Divide prepared yellow cake batter into two bowls. Add 2 ounces of melted chocolate into one bowl and orange extract into the other bowl. Drop cake batter by spoonfuls into two prepared 9 in. cake pans. Be sure to alternate between the chocolate and orange batters to create the desired marble look. Bake cake layers for 20-25 minutes. Cool for 5 minutes in cake pans before turning out onto racks to cool completely.
  2. While the cake layers cool, prepare the frosting. Equally divide the prepared frosting, preferably buttercream, into two bowls. Stir in the remaining 3 ounces of melted chocolate into one bowl and the orange juice into the other bowl. Add a few drops of yellow food coloring to the bowl with the orange flavored frosting.
  3. Place one cooled and leveled cake layer on a cake board. Spread a generous amount of chocolate frosting evenly over the top of the cake layer. Place the second cake layer on top. Cover the sides with chocolate frosting and smooth. Spread the top of the cake with a generous amount of orange frosting. If replicating the piping shown here, pipe shells around the base with orange frosting, then pipe rosettes on top of the cake with chocolate frosting. Where the orange and chocolate frosting meet, place semisweet chocolate chips to form a crown border. If piping is not your particular forte, keep it simple by arranging candied orange peels around a chocolate chip to create a brown-eyed susan flower. Place the flowers around the top of the cake to complete the look.

 

 

 

All content © Honeybee’s Patisserie 2011

Orange Drop Doughnuts

Old-fashioned drop and fry doughnuts are by far the easiest variety of the doughnut family, so why have they slipped from our modern kitchens??? Maybe it’s the advancements time has made which allowed other doughnut varieties to create more complex appearing confections, such as jelly-filled, bear claws, and crullers. However, drop doughnuts do have one thing over their yeast-raised brethren…simplicity.  The Orange Drop Doughnuts I tested have a delicate texture and are rich with orange flavor yet they didn’t take long hours to achieve.  Their simplicity alone should be reason enough why we shouldn’t completely disregard them but rather resurrect them in our kitchens to learn more about their potentials in flavor and texture.

 Let’s begin delving deeper into drop doughnuts by starting with some history on their origins. Drop doughnuts are a relative of the cake doughnut. Cake doughnuts began as an American trend, starting in the late 1800’s, when the availability of baking powder became mainstream. Cake doughnuts quickly became loved by all Americans as 19th-century cookbooks touted them easier than the rolled and stamped yeast variety. Instead of the tedious rolling and stamping required by yeast doughnuts, drop doughnuts could simply drop spoons of cake batter into hot oil. Fresh doughnuts could now be on the table for dessert or a delicious snack within a few short minutes. But it wasn’t the ease and speed that made these doughnuts so popular. That title belongs to the requests made by returning American Soldiers.

During World War I,  young female Salvation Army officers decided to bring some cheer to the American Soldiers as they fought hard in France. Using limited ingredients, they fried up doughnuts in military helmets to serve to soldiers with coffee. Often trudging through the trenches, these “Doughnut Girls” made sure doughnuts were delivered with coffee to the grateful soldiers. In World War II, the Salvation Army and American Red Cross workers served doughnuts at a rate of 400 per minute to American Soldiers. Upon returning home, the soldiers, called “Doughboys”, brought their cravings for doughnuts back with them. Soldiers raised the demand for drop doughnuts on the homefront and unlike those made in times of war, the wider variety of ingredients allowed for new flavors to be requested. Cinnamon Spice, Chocolate, and Orange became popular flavors in the late 1940’s and 1950’s. Betty Crocker cookbooks and magazines began publishing numerous recipes for drop doughnuts during this period of time. Today however, little popularity remains for the drop doughnut. It’s glory days have since gone…until now.

Being a Floridian and in the land of citrus, I chose to try the Orange-flavored drop doughnuts. Most formulas call for extreme amounts of flour, milk and only a little bit of orange juice for flavor. First off, I wanted lots of orange flavor, so using only orange juice instead of milk and orange juice in the batter was key. Also added to the batter was a dash of orange extract and a heaping amount of grated orange zest. To finish off the orange flavor, the doughnuts are rolled in orange-flavored sugar. The next necessary alteration needed to the usual formula was to delete some of the massive amount of flour which creates a very dense doughnut. By adding less flour and a bit of baking powder, the doughnuts were lighter and less likely to fill up your belly faster (possibly not a good thing for waistlines). To add richer flavor without overpowering the already established orange goodness, I used some eggs and a bit of melted butter.

 As the frying began, citrus scents wafted from the kitchen and throughout the house. It was as if the windows were open during those certain times of year we have here in Florida when the blossoms on the orange trees are in full bloom and the smell of citrus fills the air near the groves. Except this was even better a scent as it was mixed with the smell of cake batter and citrus. I will add a few cautionary notes. When frying these doughnuts, be sure to use a spoon to ladle them down into the hot oil. This will prevent unnecessary splashes of hot oil and burns to precious skin. When adding the spoonfuls of batter, be sure not to overcrowd the pan. About six spoonfuls is the max. Once the doughnuts are finished cooking, they should float to the top of the oil. The easiest way to remove them is to use a slotted spoon. This helps remove excess oil and is the easiest way to scoop up the bobbing confections. Placing the cooked doughnuts on paper towels to cool helps remove the remaining oil that escaped the slotted spoon before the doughnuts are covered in the orange sugar.

Formula: Orange Drop Doughnuts

Ingredients:

Doughnuts

  • 2 qts. Vegetable Oil
  • 2 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 tsp. Baking Powder
  • 1/4 tsp. Salt
  • 2 Large Eggs
  • 1/2 cup Sugar
  • 1 tbsp. Grated Orange Zest
  • 1/2 cup Orange Juice
  • 1/4 tsp. Orange Extract
  • 2 tbsp. Unsalted Butter, melted

Orange Sugar

  • 1/2 cup Sugar
  • 1 tsp. Grated Orange Zest

Procedure:

  1. Heat 3 in. of vegetable oil in 4 qt. saucepan until temperature reaches 350°. Mix flour, baking powder, and salt together in a bowl. Whisk eggs, sugar, and orange zest in a large bowl. Whisk in orange juice, orange extract, and then butter, until well combined. Gently stir in flour mixture until combined and moistened.
  2. Using a dinner teaspoon, drop heaping teaspoonfuls of batter into the preheated hot oil. Fry the doughnuts, making sure to maintain the temperature between 325° and 350°, until they are crisp and deep brown on all sides, about 3 to 6 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the doughnuts to a dish lined with paper towels. Let drain and cool for 5 minutes.
  3. To make the orange sugar, pulse the sugar and zest in a food processor until blended. If you do not own a food processor, you can toss the zest and sugar together in a medium bowl until blended.
  4. Once drained and cooled, add the doughnuts to the bowl of orange sugar. Toss until well coated. Repeat with remaining batter, being sure to regulate oil temperature at all times. Doughnuts are best served warm but can be stored in an airtight container.

 

Special Thanks to: The Salvation Army, The American Red Cross, & Bridget Lancaster

All content © Honeybee’s Patisserie 2011