Skinny Tuscan Lemon Muffins

20170521_161331Summer is just around the corner and that means longer, hotter days and kids running around the house 24/7 (if you are a parent). Although summer is supposed to be a more relaxed time of year it can actually be more hectic, especially if you are an adult with school age children. With the summer schedule already (or about to be) in full gear, it is good to have versatile recipes that are quick and easy to prepare and light on the palate.

20170521_161513Muffins are my preferred versatile recipe item, mainly because they were the first thing I learned to bake on my own as a kid. They are quick and easy to prepare, leave minimal clean-up, and have a seemingly infinite amount of flavor combinations so you never get bored. Today, I elected to work with the flavors of Italy, hence the name Skinny Tuscan Lemon Muffins. A combination of classic Italian ingredients (lemon, ricotta, and olive oil) creates a tart and satisfying muffin. The combination of ricotta cheese and olive oil make this muffin insanely moist, like a mini lemon pound cake. For striking lemon flavor, lemon zest and juice was not enough. To get lemon flavor that shines through everything else, I added lemon extract with the zest and juice. If you don’t like a heavy lemon flavor you can always omit the extract. Lastly, each muffin is finished with a heavy sprinkle of turbinado sugar to lend a crunchy textural contrast.

20170521_161429I highly recommend giving these muffins a try, especially this summer. They are great fresh out of the oven, at room temperature, or reheated. If you want to keep some on hand for quick snacks they can be frozen for longer storage and reheated in the microwave or simply left out to thaw on the counter to room temperature. If you elect to keep them at room temperature right after baking, make sure you store them in an airtight container and do not hold for more than 3 days (although they will likely never last that long). Enjoy these muffins at breakfast with coffee, grab one out the door before work/school, enjoy one as a sweet afternoon snack with tea, or fulfill a late night sweet craving. The possibilities are seemingly endless!

 

Skinny Tuscan Lemon Muffins

Ingredients:

  • 7.9 ounces All-Purpose Flour (about 1 ¾ cups)
  • ¾ cup Granulated Sugar
  • 2 ½ tsp. Baking Powder
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • ¾ cup part-skim Ricotta Cheese
  • ½ cup Water
  • ¼ cup Olive Oil
  • 1 tbsp. Grated Lemon Zest
  • 2 tbsp. Fresh Lemon Juice
  • ½ tsp. Pure Lemon Extract
  • 1 large Egg; lightly beaten
  • Turbinado Sugar (Sugar in the Raw); for topping

 

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°. Coat a 12-cup muffin tin with cooking spray or fill tray with muffin-cup liners and coat liners with cooking spray. Set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Make a well in the center. Set aside.
  3. In a small bowl, combine ricotta, water, oil, zest, juice, lemon extract, and egg. Add ricotta mixture to the flour mixture, stirring just until moist.
  4. Divide batter evenly among the prepared muffin cups. Sprinkle turbinado sugar over batter in each muffin cup. Bake 15-16 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in the muffin tin then transfer muffins to a wire rack to cool completely or serve warm.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

(1 Muffin)

NutritionLabel

 

Weight Watchers: 7 Smart Points, 4 Points Plus, or 4 Traditional Points

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM: MAUREEN CALLAHAN
PHOTOGRAPHY & STAGING: PETER MENDOROS

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEES PATISSERIE 2017

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Skinny Citrus Pudding

20170216_134210We still have a few more weeks of winter before we officially hit spring despite many places across the country experiencing milder temperatures than usual. For many across the nation, winter is a time when it is harder to find fresh, in season produce to utilize. Citrus is currently one of the select finds currently in season across the nation and in abundance this time of year. If you find yourself with a lot of citrus and want to experiment with something new than this recipe is just for you.

20170216_133233Some of you may look at this and be confused thinking it is more like a citrus curd and not a pudding, but I assure you it is indeed a pudding. This pudding uses cornstarch as a thickener and a curd does not use cornstarch. If you begin eating this with the mindset of a traditional pudding you will probably be a little shocked. It is tart so be warned. Don’t be tempted to add more sugar. If you want it to be a little tamer than I suggest cutting back on the orange zest by ¼ tsp. If you are looking for a different type of light dessert that is inexpensive and easy to prepare than give this recipe a go. It surely will not disappoint!

20170216_133225Skinny Citrus Pudding

Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp. Sugar
  • 1 tsp. Grated Orange Zest
  • 1 cup Fresh Orange Juice
  • 1 cup Tangerine Juice
  • 3 tbsp. Cornstarch
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • 1 tbsp. Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1 tsp. Unsalted Butter
  • ¼ cup Heavy Whipping Cream; divided
  • Mint; optional

Preparation:

  1. Combine the sugar and orange zest in a small saucepan; crush with spatula or a wooden spoon to excrete oils of zest into sugar (sugar will turn yellowish-orange in color).
  2. Stir in the tangerine juice, orange juice, cornstarch, and salt. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Boil 2 minutes or until thickened, stirring constantly. Remove from heat; stir in lemon juice and butter. Pour the pudding into a bowl; cover surface of pudding with plastic wrap and chill.
  3. Place cream in bowl and beat with a mixer on high speed until stiff peaks form. Fold half of the cream into the pudding.
  4. To serve: Spoon ½ cup pudding into dessert bowls or glasses. Top each serving with 1 tbsp. of whipped cream and a sprig of mint (if desired).

 

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

(½ cup pudding & 1 tbsp. cream)

 

citruspuddingnutritionlabel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight Watchers: 9 Smart Points, 5 Points Plus, or 4 Traditional Points

 

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM: DEBORAH MADISON
PHOTOGRAPHY & STAGING: PETER MENDOROS

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEES PATISSERIE 2017

Lemon Meringue Tart

16 - 1 (1)Bright, citrusy desserts are the perfect way to end a summer meal. Since there is always one of the many varieties of lemon in season year round, a dessert focused on lemons is a great way to indulge in a summer citrus craving while keeping with seasonal produce. The lemon meringue tart is one of my favorites, as it offers a quick and relatively simple way to feature lemons in a show-stopping summer dessert.

16 - 1 (2)For those of you familiar with the popular lemon meringue pie, you may be wondering how a tart is any different other than the pan it is baked in. Truth is they are very similar in appearance but the difference lies heavily in the crust and filling. A pie uses a lemon custard for the filling, which contains flour or cornstarch to thicken and little to no butter for flavor. On the other hand, a tart uses lemon curd for the filling, which contains no flour/cornstarch and has butter added for a creamy, smooth texture. Lemon curds also tends to have more lemon juice or zest added, creating a more intense lemon flavor. There is also a noticeable difference in the crusts. A pie uses the traditional flaky pie crust as a base while the tart will use a ground almond/cookie crumb crust.

16 - 1Both the crust and filling of this tart are very easy to prepare. The only part that may trip up beginner bakers is the meringue. That is why I chose to use a swiss meringue as it is more stable and doesn’t need to be baked like other meringues. I also chose to use store-bought lemon curd for convenience but you could easily prepare your own. This tart is baked in a 9 inch tart pan and will make approximately 8 servings.

Lemon Meringue Tart

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup Blanched Almonds
  • 3 tbsp. Light Brown Sugar
  • 36 Vanilla Wafers
  • ¼ cup Unsalted Butter; melted
  • 1 (10 oz.) Jar Lemon Curd
  • 3 Large Egg Whites
  • 1/8 tsp. Salt
  • ¼ cup Granulated Sugar
  • ¼ cup Water
  • ½ tsp. Vanilla Extract

Preparation:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Lightly coat the bottom and sides of a 9-inch tart pan with nonstick cooking spray. Set aside.
  2. In a food processor, combine the almonds, brown sugar, and wafers. Process mixture until finely ground. With the motor running, drizzle the butter through the food chute and process until blended. Press the mixture into the bottom and up the sides of the tart pan. Bake crust for 10 minutes or until well toasted. Set aside to cool.
  3. Once crust has cooled, spoon lemon curd evenly into crust. Place egg whites and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer or a large bowl. Beat with a stand or hand mixer on high-speed until soft peaks form.
  4. Preheat broiler. In a small saucepan, combine granulated sugar and water. Bring mixture to a boil. Cook mixture, without stirring, until a candy thermometer registers 250°. With mixer running, slowly pour the hot syrup over the egg whites and beat until stiff peaks form. Spread the egg white mixture over the tart. Broil for 30 seconds or until lightly browned. Serve

PHOTOGRAPHY & STAGING: PETER MENDOROS

 

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEES PATISSERIE 2016

Lemon-Poppy Seed Angel Food Cake

20140416_112632With winter officially over and the onset of Spring, everyone naturally turns to fresh, light, and airy trends. Clothing takes on hues of light pastels and airy designs, homes become lighter following dreaded bouts of extensive cleaning, and food menus turn to the flavors of seasonal fresh fruits like the recently harvested lemon. With spring also comes the rush to reach goal weights set back around new years before summer bikini season starts. What dessert could possibly fit the requirements of all these springtime cliches??? Enter now the Lemon-Poppy Seed Angel Food Cake.

20140416_111551Unlike other cakes, angel food cake uses absolutely no butter or oil, not even to grease the pan. It is very light and airy with a bit of sponge at first bite. Perhaps the best cake to eat on a diet. This cake also does not use baking soda or baking powder…. but how does it get its statuesque height??? EGG WHITES… and a whole lot of them I must add. In fact this cake has a very short ingredient list. But do not be deceived by the apparent simplicity. With simplicity comes more stress to the smallest of details. That flour you didn’t think you needed to sift will lend you a dense, squat cake. Or that little microscopic speck of egg yolk that slipped into the whites while you were separating them will forever prevent you from reaching proper peaks. Without gentle care this majestically tall, snowy-white cake can turn dense, wet, and depressing. You don’t want to serve a depressing cake reminescent to the blah winter blues to a crowd of cheery guests at an Easter party.

20140416_112443If you are careful to follow this recipe with care you are sure to produce consistent sky-high beauties flecked with bits of poppy seeds and bursts of lemon in each bite… absolutely perfect to serve for any springtime celebration. The key you must always remember while preparing this is the volume of the egg whites you whip up so be sure to watch for any hint of yolk when separating the eggs initially. You can use cold or room temperature eggs since both will ultimately whip up to the same volume, however cold eggs will take a little bit longer and are more likely to make you start questioning if you messed something up along the way when you really haven’t. To add some reassurance that you won’t end up with deflated whites I always use cream of tartar because the acidity it offers helps to stabilize the whipped whites.

20140416_111751I know it may be tempting but do not use all-purpose flour in this recipe. You will end up with a cake more like overly soft bread that plasters to the roof of your mouth when you eat it. Not flattering. If your tube pan does not have a removable bottom, I recommend lining it with parchment paper. Just make sure you never grease any part of the pan or parchment. The eggs need to cling to the pans surface in order to rise high and if you grease the pan the eggs can not grip the pan and you will end up with a short stubby brick of a cake. Not cool. After being separated from Angel Food Cake since my grandmother last made it during the holidays, I can confidently say this cake is a keeper for generations to come.

Serves: 10 generous portions or 12 smaller portions

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Lemon-Poppy Seed Angel Food Cake

Ingredients:

  • 4½ oz. Cake Flour (approximately 1 cup plus 2 tbsp. if you do not have a scale)
  • ¼ tsp. Salt
  • 1¾ cups Granulated Sugar
  • 12 Egg Whites
  • 1½ tsp. Cream of Tartar
  • 1 tsp. Lemon Extract
  • 1 tbsp. Lemon Zest; grated
  • 2 tbsp. Lemon Juice; (approximately 2-3 lemons)
  • 1 tbsp. Poppy Seeds

Formula:

  1. Adjust the oven rack to the lower-middle position and preheat the oven to 325°. Whisk the flour and salt together in a bowl. Set aside. Process the sugar in a food processor until fine and powdery, approximately 1 minute. Set aside about half of the processed sugar in a small bowl. Add the flour mixture to the remaining sugar left in the food processor and process until well aerated as if sifted, about another minute.
  2. With a stand mixer set to medium-low speed, beat the egg whites and cream of tartar until frothy. Increase the speed to medium-high and with the motor running, slowly add the sugar set aside earlier. Make sure to evenly distribute the sugar around the bowl and do not add it all in one spot or you run the risk of deflating the egg whites. Continue to beat until soft peaks form, about 5 minutes. Add the lemon extract, zest, and juice. Mix until just incorporated.
  3. Sift the flour mixture over the whipped egg whites in 3 separate additions. Fold the mixture gently with a rubber spatula after each addition until incorporated. Gently stir in the poppy seeds until evenly distributed. Scrape cake batter into a 12-cup UNGREASED tube pan.
  4. Bake the cake until a toothpick inserted near the center of the cake comes out clean and the cracks in the top of the cake appear dry not wet, about 40 to 45 minutes. Remove the cake from the oven and invert the cake on a bottle if your tube pan does not have a stand and allow to cool to room temperature upside down, about 3 hours. This keeps the cake from deflating. Once cool, turn the cake right side up and run a knife around the edges of the pan. Invert the pan on a platter & serve.

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

 

PHOTOGRAPHY & STAGING: PETER MENDOROS

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEE’S PATISSERIE 2014

Mini 7UP Pound Cakes

20140224_114457When you think of 7UP, cake probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. Although if this were the 1950’s, it would have been the first among a slew of other 7UP concoctions like 7UP Salad or 7UP Parfait Pie. This is a result of soda companies in the 50’s marketing their products to be a baking staple rather than a mere thirst quencher. 7UP went so far with their advertising campaigns that the company gave away free recipe booklets in tandem with an ad for shoppers suggesting they “get some extra 7UP for cooking.” Many of these recipes have been lost over the years and for good reason. One that deserves to have a modern refresher is 7UP Pound Cake.

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In order to create a modern take to a classic, I had to dig a little bit into the history of why this recipe was one of the few successes. It turns out we may never have been graced with the fizzy lemon-lime drink if its creator would have had his initial way. 7UP was created by St. Louis native Charles Grigg. For years, Grigg tried to market an orange soda, but Orange Crush had the market and squashed his efforts every time. Grigg decided to switch gears and market a lemon-lime soda under the label Bib. Just weeks before the big stock market crash and onset of the Great Depression, Grigg got his big break and adults loved the uplifting qualities the new soda gave them. Years later, following the end of Prohibition, the company would create an entire new marketing strategy for 7UP revolving around all things alcohol. Ads like “7UP is more than just a mixer…It blends out the harsh features. Dispels hangovers. Takes the ouch out of grouch.” made adults love the drink for it’s medicinal cures of hangovers and endless possibilities as a cocktail mixer.

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Push ahead into the 50’s and we again reach the ad campaign targeting cooks to use their products in the kitchen. So why does 7UP seem to work so well in certain recipes like the Pound Cake. Turns out, the slightly acidic soda gives the cake flavor, lift, and a tender texture that is unique to the soda infused batter. With my history down I turned to modernizing the recipe. We live in an era where everyone enjoys a mini version of a larger original. Reasons for this are quite diverse. Some are health conscious and wish to indulge in old favorites without the guilt while others enjoy entertaining and offering a wide selection of petit four style desserts so guests can try a wide array without getting full too fast. With this in mind, I altered the traditional recipe that bakes the cake in a tube or bundt pan and instead baked the batter in a greased muffin tin. Once the cakes were removed from the oven I quickly cored them with an apple corer and filled the centers with lemon curd for more lemon flavor. To cover the filling, I swirled a lemon-lime tinged frosting flavored with a few drops of Lemon extract into the yellow frosting and a few drops of lime juice in the green frosting to give the final citrus punch. If these little cakes aren’t good enough to make 7UP’s next marketing campaign, I don’t know what will!!!

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Note: Be sure to use fresh 7UP. If flat, the cake’s texture and rise will suffer greatly. If you want you may bake this in a traditional tube pan or Bundt pan, altering the baking time to 75 minutes and omitting the Lemon Curd filling. The formula yields 24 cupcakes or 1 cake that serves 12.

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Mini 7UP Pound Cakes

 

Ingredients:

  • 2½ cups Granulated Sugar
  • 5 Eggs; room temperature
  • ½ cup 7UP; room temperature
  • 2 tsp. Lemon Extract
  • 2 tbsp. Lime Juice
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 20 tbsp. (2½ sticks) Unsalted Butter; melted and slightly cooled
  • 3¼ cups Cake Flour
  • Lemon Curd; for filling
  • 2 tubs White Frosting
  • Yellow Food Color
  • Green Food Color
  • 1 tsp. Lemon Extract; for frosting
  • 1 tsp. Lime Juice; for frosting

Formula:

  1. Heat oven to 300° and grease a 12-cup muffin tin with nonstick cooking spray. Mix sugar, eggs, 7UP, lemon juice, lime juice, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer until smooth. With machine running, slowly pour in the butter and mix until incorporated. Add the flour in three additions, mixing between each addition, until combined.
  2. Pour the batter into the prepared muffin tin, filling each cup ¾ full. Bake until a toothpick inserted comes out with a few crumbs, about 25 to 30 minutes. Let cool in pan 5 minutes. Remove cakes from pan and repeat with the remaining batter.
  3. While the second batch bakes, use an apple corer to remove a section in the middle of the each cake. Using a small spoon, fill the hole with a generous amount of lemon curd and smooth out the top. Allow cakes to cool completely.
  4. Once the cakes are cooled, add a few drops of yellow food color to one tub of frosting and a few drops of green food color to the other tub of frosting. Add the lemon extract to the yellow tub of frosting and the lime juice to the green tub of frosting. Mix until both tubs of frosting are well combined. In a large piping bag fitted with a large star tip, fill one side of the bag with the green frosting and one side with the yellow frosting. Pipe a small rosette on the top of each cake, making sure to cover the area of exposed lemon curd filling. To complete the look, cut straws into small pieces and place into the frosting of each cake at an angle to give a soda pop theme.

 

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

 

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM CALI RICH

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEE’S PATISSERIE 2014

Lemon Pudding Cake

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Today I was trying to finish my family tree on Ancestors.com to one day give to my daughter and any other future children so that they will know where they came from. While taking a break from my research I decided to bake. Sticking with the theme of the past I chose to make a forgotten recipe I came across a few years ago called Lemon Pudding Cake. This cake is thought to have been a variation off of flour puddings from the late 1700’s like one found in Amelia Simmons’ 1796 cookbook “American Cookery”.

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Although the flour pudding recipe from Ms. Simmons is said to be an abomination to our modern taste buds, I must say this lost recipe is magical on so many levels. Not only does it taste great but one batter manages to create two separate layers… the top being airy like a souffle and the bottom dense and creamy as a custard. Although considered a cake, this dessert is somewhere between a cake and a custard.

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You may be wondering what causes such culinary sorcery.  Well it all starts with the batter, which is rather atypical. It contains very little flour, a ton of egg, and a lot more liquid than usual. It is the large amount of liquid that actually causes the magic. The water in the liquid ingredients actually sinks to the bottom of the dish and takes the batter with it. This leaves the egg whites to float to the top and give the airy souffle-like cake over the custard base.

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Although practically forgotten in our modern era this cake has proven to me to stand the test of time. I’m sure my grandfather would have loved to have tried this since he had such a love for Lemon Meringue Pie and this has all the same tastes of Lemon Meringue Pie but in a cake/custard hybrid.

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Notes: To have the most prevalent lemon flavor, it takes fresh squeezed lemon juice and a bit of lemon extract. Do nut use bottled lemon juice. Be sure to use the cornstarch and not substitute more flour as it firms the custard base without distracting from the lemon flavor. To prevent the top layer of egg whites from deflating, add the sugar slowly and evenly over the egg whites while whipping. This will help stabilize them and result in a high, fluffy golden cake. To keep the custard base from curdling like scrambled eggs while baking, it is essential to put the ramekins in a hot water bath. This keeps the base from cooking too quickly and results in a creamy custard. This formula serves 6 and is best served warm or at room temperature the day it is made.

Lemon Pudding Cake

Ingredients:

  • ¼ cup All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 tsp. Cornstarch
  • 1 ¼ cups Sugar; divided
  • 5 tbsp. Unsalted Butter; softened
  • 2 tsp. Pure Lemon Extract
  • ½ cup Fresh Lemon Juice; about 4 Lemons
  • 5 Eggs; separated
  • 1 ¼ cups Whole Milk; room temperature
  • Boiling Water

Formula:

  1. Adjust the oven rack to the lowest position. Heat oven to 325°. Grease 6 Ramekins and place inside a large roasting pan.
  2. Mix flour and cornstarch together in a bowl. Set aside. With an electric mixer, beat ½ cup sugar, butter, and lemon extract on medium-high speed until light and fluffy. Beat in yolks, one at a time, until incorporated. Reduce speed to medium-low and add the flour mixture, mixing until incorporated. Slowly add the milk and lemon juice, mixing until just combined.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat egg whites on medium-high speed until soft peaks form. As mixer continues to run, slowly and evenly add the remaining sugar until the whites become firm and appear glossy. Whisk 1/3 of the whites into the cake batter. Gently fold the remaining whites, one scoop at a time, until well combined.
  4. Spoon the batter evenly into each prepared ramekin. Carefully place pan on the lowest oven rack and pour boiling water into the pan until the water comes halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Bake until the surface becomes golden brown and the edges are set. The center should jiggle slightly if gently shaken, about 1 hour. Remove from the oven and transfer to a wire rack and allow to cool at least 15 minutes. Serve while warm or at room temperature.

 

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

 

PETER MENDOROS – PHOTOGRAPHY  & STAGING

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM KRIS WIDICAN

ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEE’S PATISSERIE 2014

Lemon Drop Cookies

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Driving down the county highways here in Florida I was given the quick reminder that we have entered fall after spotting little unripe oranges decorating all the trees in the groves. My craving for citrus peaked at that moment but I really have had a huge lack of energy to the point I have trouble getting out of bed in the morning. As much as I love baking, to use the few shreds of energy I manage to muster on making a messy kitchen and then having to clean it up just isn’t feasible. So I had to ask myself, what is the simplest item I could make that would still be complex enough to excite my taste buds. The answer… Lemon Drop Cookies.

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These cookies are simple and use ingredients that are staples in anyone’s pantry. For such basic ingredients, these cookies possess a very unique texture. They are fluffy and moist but still manage to be sturdy enough to carry around the house without dropping crumbs all over.  The lemon flavor gives the cookie a slight tang that finishes with a sweetness that isn’t overbearing. To finish off these soft, cake-like wonders, a very simple confectioners’ sugar glaze tinted yellow and given a slight dose of lemon flavor make this simple confection appear more glamorous than it really is… for at the end of the day it is a cookie… just an amazingly epic cookie.

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I promise you if you give these little canary gems a chance they will become a cookie everyone in the family can appreciate and love. The formula yields about 3 dozen cookies. Cookies can be stored in an airtight container for 3 days.

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Lemon Drop Cookies

Cookie Ingredients:

  • 3 cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 tsp. Baking Powder
  • ½ tsp. Baking Soda
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 16 tbsp. (2 Sticks) Unsalted Butter, softened
  • 1 ½ cups Granulated Sugar
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 cup Sour Cream
  • 2 tsp. Lemon Zest, grated
  • 1 tsp. Lemon Extract

Glaze Ingredients:

  • 2 ½ cups Confectioners’ Sugar; sifted
  • 1 tbsp. Butter
  • 2 to 2 ½ tbsp. Lemon Juice
  • Milk; enough to create desired consistency
  • Yellow Food Color; optional
  • Decorative Sprinkles; optional

Formula:

  1. For the cookies: Adjust oven racks to the upper-middle and lower-middle positions. Heat oven to 375°. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. Whisk flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt together in a large bowl.
  3. With mixer on medium speed, beat butter and sugar together until fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, and beat until incorporated. Reduce speed to low and beat in the sour cream, lemon zest, and lemon extract. Add the flour mixture and mix until combined.
  4. Refrigerate the dough until slightly firm, about 1 hour. Drop rounded tablespoonfuls of batter onto the prepared baking sheets, spacing cookies about 2 inches apart. Bake until cookies are just golden around the edges, about 15 minutes, rotating baking sheets halfway through the cooking time. Cool cookies on the baking sheets. Repeat with remaining dough.
  5. For the glaze: With a mixer, combine the sugar, butter, and lemon juice together. Add enough milk to achieve the desired consistency. Add a few drops of yellow food color if desired.
  6. Once the cookies have completely cooled, use an off-set spatula to spread a thick layer of glaze on each cookie. Decorate with sprinkles if desired. Serve.

 

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SPECIAL THANKS TO:

 

PETER MENDOROS – PHOTOGRAPHY  & STAGING

RECIPE ADAPTED FROM MERILEE KUCHON

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ALL REMAINING CONTENT © HONEYBEE’S PATISSERIE 2013